IBM Bans Windows 2000!

Distortion of public standards makes Windows 2000 incompatible with IBM's worldwide networks.

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IBM loudly proclaims it will be the world's biggest supporter and service provider for Windows 2000. One exec even said IBM would convert 300,000 of its own desktops to Windows 2000 as soon as it was out.

Reality is different. IBM has banned connection of any Windows 2000 computer to any IBM production network. They can only be attached to special test and demonstration networks where no critical business or communications systems can be harmed.

The reason is adequately explained in our article Adopting Windows 2000, specifically the paragraph "Distorted Standards". Particularly at issue for IBM is Microsoft's corruption of the DHCP (Dynamic Host Control Protocol) standard.

Microsoft boasts of how many Internet standards they have incorporated into Windows 2000. In actual fact, these are standards in name only, because they have been deliberately distorted to be compatible only with Windows 2000. Microsoft's policy of "Embrace, Extend, Eliminate" may have backfired this time.

IBM found that attaching a Windows 2000 computer to any one of its networks risked disruption of the entire network. Details can be found in Sm@rt Reseller April 10, 2000. We'll link right here as soon as they put that issue on their Web site.

UPDATE: 10-May-00 - Despite its obvious impact, the only publication other than Sm@rt Reseller to pick up this story was The Register. Sm@rt Reseller did not index the item, so there is no on-line link (fortunately we have the paper version). The existance of the IBM memo has been confirmed and neither IBM nor Microsoft denied it in any way. The trade press still lives under the influence of Microsoft advertising budget and PR machine.

©:Andrew Grygus - Automation Access - www.aaxnet.com - aax@aaxnet.com
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