WSP Blasts Microsoft

It's "Embrace Extend Exterminate" all over again. Internet Explorer 5.5 flaunts standards.

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April 2000 - The W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) sets standards for Web pages and Web browsers. Microsoft has promised to support W3C standards, but when it comes down to actual products (in this case the Internet Explorer 5.5 beta release), Microsoft has once again chosen to make developers and business chose between "Microsoft standards" and real standards.

The WSP (Web Standards Project), a nonprofit group, has tested Internet Explorer 5.5 and says it selectively implements the W3C standards. Microsoft says, "We have implemented the parts people care about". Their objective, as usual, is to make Windows incompatible with the rest of the world, then leverage their desktop monopoly to declare the rest of the world "incompatible".

Interestingly, since Microsoft doesn't really care about the Macintosh market, the Macintosh version of Internet Explorer 5.5 fully implements the W3C standard. Makes it kind of obvious what they're up to, doesn't it?

In the past this strategy has been phenomenally successful, but the past is, well, past. The first truly catastrophic failure of Microsoft's policy of "Embrace, Extend, Exterminate" was this month when IBM totally banned any Windows 2000 computer from connection to any of its business networks, anywhere in the world, due to Microsoft's deliberate corruption of DHCP standards. Microsoft may be the 800 pound gorilla, but when Colosalsaurus IBM finally moves its 800 ton ass, the gorilla don't sleep there anymore.

In related action, industry outrage has forced Microsoft to publish the proprietary authentication protocols they used to corrupt the Kerberos security standard in Windows 2000.

The world it is a change'n.

©:Andrew Grygus - Automation Access - www.aaxnet.com - aax@aaxnet.com
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